Pillar II: National Security

The National Security Division of The American Legion represents the organization’s positions on national defense, homeland security and quality of life for our servicemembers and their families. Since its inception, The American Legion has steadfastly supported a strong national defense. The American Legion closely monitors issues that are most relevant to our nation’s vital security interests. The American Legion works closely with each branch of the U.S. Armed Forces in an effort to stay well-informed about issues that affect our troops and our military families. As such, The American Legion continues to make troop strength and military quality of life a top priority.

The American Legion’s national security position is multifaceted. Key aspects include:
• A well-funded, well-equipped and well-trained military.
• Awareness and surveillance of rogue nations, terrorist groups and global threats to U.S. security around the world.
• Support for the Department of Homeland Security and urging protection of U.S. borders, ports and other points of access.
• Comprehensive disaster preparedness.
• Decent quality of life for troops and their families – active-duty and reserve components alike – that includes reasonable compensation, benefits, health care, child care and family support programs; and an efficient and compassionate healing and transition program for wounded and ill warriors.
• Matters such as the transition to civilian life and using the VA health-care system, TRICARE or TRICARE For Life also fall within the realm of national security. The American Legion represents military members during the medical discharge process and assists in their pursuit of education benefits, employment counseling, training and health care.
• The American Legion works as an advocate for an improved disability evaluation system within the Department of Defense by providing counseling, guidance and representation for service members through the proceedings of the medical evaluation and physical evaluation boards. Staff regularly meets with military personnel one-on-one and in group settings to alert them about the resources and opportunities available as they prepare to return home.

Based on current conflicts and their residual effects on U.S. military service members and their families, The American Legion’s National Security Division has made the following issues legislative priorities:

Featured image courtesy of Task and Purpose